Titlebar

Export bibliographic data
Literature by the same author
plus on the publication server
plus at Google Scholar

 

Honeybee colonies compensate for pesticide-induced effects on royal jelly composition and brood survival with increased brood production

DOI zum Zitieren der Version auf EPub Bayreuth: https://doi.org/10.15495/EPub_UBT_00005683
URN to cite this document: urn:nbn:de:bvb:703-epub-5683-9

Title data

Schott, Matthias ; Sandmann, Maximilian ; Cresswell, James E. ; Becher, Matthias A. ; Eichner, Gerrit ; Brandt, Dominique Tobias ; Halitschke, Rayko ; Krueger, Stephanie ; Morlock, Gertrud ; Düring, Rolf-Alexander ; Vilcinskas, Andreas ; Meixner, Marina Doris ; Büchler, Ralph ; Brandt, Annely:
Honeybee colonies compensate for pesticide-induced effects on royal jelly composition and brood survival with increased brood production.
In: Scientific Reports. Vol. 11 (2021) Issue 1 . - No. 62.
ISSN 2045-2322
DOI der Verlagsversion: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-020-79660-w

[img]
Format: PDF
Name: Schottetal2021Honeybee colonies compensate for pesticide‑induced effects on royal jelly composition and brood survival with increased brood production.pdf
Version: Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons BY 4.0: Attribution
Download (2MB)
[img]
Format: PDF
Name: Schott2021SupplementHoneybee colonies compensate for pesticide‑induced effects on royal jelly composition and brood survival with increased brood production.pdf
Version: Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons BY 4.0: Attribution
Download (1MB)

Abstract

Sublethal doses of pesticides affect individual honeybees, but colony-level effects are less well understood and it is unclear how the two levels integrate. We studied the effect of the neonicotinoid pesticide clothianidin at field realistic concentrations on small colonies. We found that exposure to clothianidin affected worker jelly production of individual workers and created a strong dose-dependent increase in mortality of individual larvae, but strikingly the population size of capped brood remained stable. Thus, hives exhibited short-term resilience. Using a demographic matrix model, we found that the basis of resilience in dosed colonies was a substantive increase in brood initiation rate to compensate for increased brood mortality. However, computer simulation of full size colonies revealed that the increase in brood initiation led to severe reductions in colony reproduction (swarming) and long-term survival. This experiment reveals social regulatory mechanisms on colony-level that enable honeybees to partly compensate for effects on individual level.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Keywords: Sublethal effects; Honeybees; pesticides; Ecotoxicology; compensation; clothianidin; modelling; computer simulation; apis mellifera
DDC Subjects: 500 Science > 500 Natural sciences
500 Science > 570 Life sciences, biology
500 Science > 590 Animals (Zoology)
Institutions of the University: Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology > Chair Animal Ecology I > Chair Animal Ecology I - Univ.-Prof. Dr. Christian Laforsch
Profile Fields
Profile Fields > Advanced Fields > Ecology and the Environmental Sciences
Faculties
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology > Chair Animal Ecology I
Profile Fields > Advanced Fields
Language: English
Originates at UBT: Yes
URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:703-epub-5683-9
Date Deposited: 29 Jun 2021 08:58
Last Modified: 29 Jun 2021 08:59
URI: https://epub.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/5683

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year