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Dispersal From Natal Patch Correlates With the Volatility of Female Sex Pheromones in Parasitoid Wasps

DOI zum Zitieren der Version auf EPub Bayreuth: https://doi.org/10.15495/EPub_UBT_00005572
URN to cite this document: urn:nbn:de:bvb:703-epub-5572-3

Title data

Böttinger, Lea C. ; Stökl, Johannes:
Dispersal From Natal Patch Correlates With the Volatility of Female Sex Pheromones in Parasitoid Wasps.
In: Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution. Vol. 8 (2020) . - No. 557527.
ISSN 2296-701X
DOI der Verlagsversion: https://doi.org/10.3389/fevo.2020.557527

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Project financing: Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

Abstract

Chemical communication via pheromones is considered the oldest and most widespread form of communication in nature. However, the way that the enormous diversity of species-specific pheromones evolved is still of debate. One possible process driving pheromone evolution is the mate-finding and dispersal behavior, as long-distance mate-finding requires highly volatile compounds. In contrast, less volatile compounds might be sufficient attractants in species that search for mates within proximity. In the parasitoid wasp genus Leptopilina, the composition of species-specific sex pheromones ranges from highly volatile iridoid compounds through combinations of iridoids with low volatile cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) to only CHCs. To study the selective forces shaping the composition of sex pheromones in Leptopilina, we examined the dispersal behavior, i.e., the proportion of male and female wasps dispersing after emergence, in four species with known sex pheromone compositions. If males and females disperse immediately, long-range mate attraction might become necessary, favoring volatile iridoids over CHCs. If mating occurs directly on the host patch, short-range mate attraction by low volatile CHCs might suffice. Our analyses have revealed that the dispersal behavior of Leptopilina males and females after emergence does indeed differ between species with differently volatile sex pheromones. Specifically, males of species with iridoid sex pheromones start to disperse immediately before their females’ emergence, whereas males of species with CHC sex pheromones delay dispersal until their conspecific females emerge. While the differences in female dispersal behavior turned out to be species-specific, differences in male dispersal correlated with the volatility of female-produced sex pheromones of each species. This study significantly contributes to our understanding of the evolution of sex pheromones by differences in dispersal behavior.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Keywords: sex pheromone; mating system; evolution; chemical communication; insects; Leptopilina; Drosophila
DDC Subjects: 500 Science > 500 Natural sciences
500 Science > 590 Animals (Zoology)
Institutions of the University: Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology > Chair Animal Ecology II - Evolutionary Animal Ecology > Chair Animal Ecology II - Evolutionary Animal Ecology - Univ.-Prof. Dr. Sandra Steiger
Faculties
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology > Chair Animal Ecology II - Evolutionary Animal Ecology
Language: English
Originates at UBT: Yes
URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:703-epub-5572-3
Date Deposited: 20 May 2021 08:55
Last Modified: 20 May 2021 08:55
URI: https://epub.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/5572

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