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Revealing the Morning Transition in the Mountain Boundary Layer Using Fiber-Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing

DOI zum Zitieren der Version auf EPub Bayreuth: https://doi.org/10.15495/EPub_UBT_00005490
URN to cite this document: urn:nbn:de:bvb:703-epub-5490-2

Title data

Fritz, Antonia M. ; Lapo, Karl ; Freundorfer, Anita ; Linhardt, Tobias ; Thomas, Christoph K.:
Revealing the Morning Transition in the Mountain Boundary Layer Using Fiber-Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing.
In: Geophysical Research Letters. Vol. 48 (2021) Issue 9 . - e2020GL092238.
ISSN 1944-8007
DOI der Verlagsversion: https://doi.org/10.1029/2020GL092238

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Project information

Project title:
Project's official titleProject's id
DarkMix - Illuminating the dark side of surface meteorology: creating a novel framework to explain atmospheric transport and turbulent mixing in the weak-wind boundary layer724629

Project financing: European Union, Horizon2020

Related research data

Abstract

In the morning, the nocturnal stable boundary layer, SBL, transitions into its daytime convective counterpart substantially impacting the distribution of temperature, humidity, and pollutants. Applying distributed temperature sensing (DTS) below a tethered balloon (2–200 m) and along a tower (0–11 m), for the first time we observed three morning transitions (MTs) in a mountain boundary layer with high temporal (<10 s) and spatial (<0.25 m) resolutions. We show that MTs are best derived from a change in static stability from synchronous DTS observations. Our findings confirm that the MT occurs at the SBL top and bottom simultaneously, and identify horizontal heat advection as a main driver aiding solar surface heating in this midrange mountain valley. We conclude that heterogenous land use and mountainous topography cause complex interactions between valley‐scale and local airflows leading to thermal signatures characterized by strong, small‐scale variability. Our study highlights DTS as a crucial tool for investigating complex thermodynamic processes.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Keywords: boundary layer, cold-air pool, distributed temperature sensing, morning transition, mountainous terrain, weak wind
DDC Subjects: 500 Science > 500 Natural sciences
500 Science > 550 Earth sciences, geology
Institutions of the University: Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Professor Micrometeorology
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Professor Micrometeorology > Professor Micrometeorology - Univ.-Prof. Dr. Christoph K. Thomas
Profile Fields > Advanced Fields > Ecology and the Environmental Sciences
Profile Fields > Advanced Fields > Nonlinear Dynamics
Faculties
Profile Fields
Profile Fields > Advanced Fields
Language: English
Originates at UBT: Yes
URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:703-epub-5490-2
Date Deposited: 19 May 2021 06:26
Last Modified: 13 Sep 2021 09:36
URI: https://epub.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/5490

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