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Thermal Submesoscale Motions in the Nocturnal Stable Boundary Layer. Part 1: Detection and Mean Statistics

DOI zum Zitieren der Version auf EPub Bayreuth: https://doi.org/10.15495/EPub_UBT_00005428
URN to cite this document: urn:nbn:de:bvb:703-epub-5428-4

Title data

Pfister, Lena ; Lapo, Karl ; Mahrt, Larry ; Thomas, Christoph K.:
Thermal Submesoscale Motions in the Nocturnal Stable Boundary Layer. Part 1: Detection and Mean Statistics.
In: Boundary-Layer Meteorology. Vol. 180 (28 April 2021) . - pp. 187-202.
ISSN 1573-1472
DOI der Verlagsversion: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10546-021-00618-0

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Project information

Project title:
Project's official titleProject's id
DarkMix - Illuminating the dark side of surface meteorology: creating a novel framework to explain atmospheric transport and turbulent mixing in the weak-wind boundary layer724629

Project financing: European Union, Horizon2020, ERC

Related research data

Abstract

Submesoscale motions within the stable boundary layer were detected during the Shallow Cold Pool Experiment conducted in the Colorado plains, Colorado, U.S.A. in 2012. The submesoscale motion consisted of two air layers creating a well-defined front with a sharp temperature gradient, and further-on referred to as a thermal submesofront (TSF). The semi-stationary TSFs and their advective velocities are detected and determined by the fibre-optic distributed-sensing (FODS) technique. An objective detection algorithm utilizing FODS measurements is able to detect the TSF boundary, which enables a detailed investigation of its spatio–temporal statistics. The novel approach in data processing is to conditionally average any parameter depending on the distance between a TSF boundary and the measurement location. By doing this, a spatially-distributed feature like TSFs can be characterized by point observations and processes at the TSF boundary can be investigated. At the TSF boundary, the air layers converge, creating an updraft, strong static stability, and vigorous mixing. Further, the TSF advective velocity of TSFs is an order of magnitude lower than the mean wind speed. Despite being gentle, the topography plays an important role in TSF formation. Details on generating mechanisms and implications of TSFs on the stable boundary layer are discussed in Part 2.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Keywords: Fibre optics; Stable boundary layer; Submesoscale motion; Topography
DDC Subjects: 500 Science > 500 Natural sciences
500 Science > 550 Earth sciences, geology
Institutions of the University: Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Professor Micrometeorology
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Professor Micrometeorology > Professor Micrometeorology - Univ.-Prof. Dr. Christoph K. Thomas
Profile Fields > Advanced Fields > Ecology and the Environmental Sciences
Profile Fields > Advanced Fields > Nonlinear Dynamics
Faculties
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences
Profile Fields
Profile Fields > Advanced Fields
Language: English
Originates at UBT: Yes
URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:703-epub-5428-4
Date Deposited: 30 Apr 2021 09:50
Last Modified: 28 Oct 2021 07:21
URI: https://epub.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/5428

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