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Arsenic metabolism in technical biogas plants : possible consequences for resident microbiota and downstream units

DOI zum Zitieren der Version auf EPub Bayreuth: https://doi.org/10.15495/EPub_UBT_00005379
URN to cite this document: urn:nbn:de:bvb:703-epub-5379-5

Title data

Weithmann, Nicolas ; Mlinar, Stanislava ; Hilbrig, Frank ; Bachmaf, Samer ; Arndt, Julia ; Planer-Friedrich, Britta ; Weig, Alfons ; Freitag, Ruth:
Arsenic metabolism in technical biogas plants : possible consequences for resident microbiota and downstream units.
In: AMB Express. Vol. 9 (2019) . - No. 190.
ISSN 2191-0855
DOI der Verlagsversion: https://doi.org/10.1186/s13568-019-0902-6

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Project financing: Bundesministerium für Ernährung und Landwirtschaft

Abstract

The metal(loid) and in particular the Arsenic (As) burden of thirteen agricultural biogas plants and two sewage sludge digesters were investigated together with the corresponding microbial consortia. The latter were characterized by ARISA (automated ribosomal intergenetic spacer analysis) and next generation sequencing. The consortia were found to cluster according to digester type rather than substrate or metal(loid) composition. For selected plants, individual As species in the liquid and gaseous phases were quantified, showing that the microorganisms actively metabolize and thereby remove the As from their environment via the formation of (methylated) volatile species. The As metabolites showed some dependency on the microbial consortia, while there was no statistical correlation with the substrate mix. Finally, slurry from one agricultural biogas plant and one sewage sludge digester was transferred into laboratory scale reactors (“satellite reactors”) and the response to a defined addition of As (30 and 60 µM sodium arsenite) was studied. The results corroborate the hypothesis of a rapid conversion of dissolved As species into volatile ones. Methanogenesis was reduced during that time, while there was no discernable toxic effect on the microbial population. However, the utilization of the produced biogas as replacement for natural gas, e.g. as fuel, may be problematic, as catalysts and machinery are known to suffer from prolonged exposure even to low As concentrations.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Additional notes (visible to public): BAYCEER154258
Keywords: Anaerobic; Archaea; Biogas; Metal(loid); Methanogenesis; Sewage sludge
DDC Subjects: 500 Science > 570 Life sciences, biology
Institutions of the University: Faculties
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Professor Environmental Geochemistry Group
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Professor Environmental Geochemistry Group > Professor Environmental Geochemistry - Univ.-Prof. Dr. Britta Planer-Friedrich
Faculties > Faculty of Engineering Science
Faculties > Faculty of Engineering Science > Chair Process Biotechnology
Faculties > Faculty of Engineering Science > Chair Process Biotechnology > Chair Process Biotechnology - Univ.-Prof. Dr. Ruth Freitag
Research Institutions
Research Institutions > Research Centres
Research Institutions > Research Centres > Bayreuth Center of Ecology and Environmental Research- BayCEER
Language: English
Originates at UBT: Yes
URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:703-epub-5379-5
Date Deposited: 07 Apr 2021 04:52
Last Modified: 07 Apr 2021 04:52
URI: https://epub.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/5379

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