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Powder Treatment for Increased Thickness of Iron Coatings Produced by the Powder Aerosol Deposition Method and Formation of Iron–Alumina Multilayer Structures

DOI zum Zitieren der Version auf EPub Bayreuth: https://doi.org/10.15495/EPub_UBT_00005349
URN to cite this document: urn:nbn:de:bvb:703-epub-5349-9

Title data

Leupold, Nico ; Denneler, Stefan ; Rieger, Gotthard ; Moos, Ralf:
Powder Treatment for Increased Thickness of Iron Coatings Produced by the Powder Aerosol Deposition Method and Formation of Iron–Alumina Multilayer Structures.
In: Journal of Thermal Spray Technology. Vol. 30 (22 October 2020) . - pp. 480-487.
ISSN 1544-1016
DOI der Verlagsversion: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11666-020-01098-3

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Abstract

The powder aerosol deposition (PAD) method is a well-known process to fabricate dense layers at room temperature directly from the powder. It is particularly suitable for the deposition of ceramic materials. Compared to these, the use of metal powders (here iron), which are significantly more ductile and have a higher density than typical ceramic powders, has not yet been investigated in detail for PAD. In the first step of this work, the iron powder is characterized by scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. In order to improve the deposition behavior, the influence of heat treatment on the crystallite and the particle size of the iron powder is investigated. It is shown that the crystallite size of iron powders is reduced down to a nanocrystalline size during deposition. The magnetic properties of the iron powder as well as the layers are investigated by means of coercive field development. Although the initial coercivity raises after deposition, potential applications for flux guiding in microelectronic sensors and devices are feasible. In the second step, thin metal layers (iron) and ceramics (aluminum oxide) are deposited alternatingly to produce iron–alumina multilayer structures.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Keywords: aerosol deposition method (ADM); crystallite size; magnetic coercivity; metal deposition; microstrain; room temperature impact consolidation (RTIC); vacuum kinetic spraying (VKS)
DDC Subjects: 600 Technology, medicine, applied sciences > 620 Engineering
Institutions of the University: Faculties
Faculties > Faculty of Engineering Science
Faculties > Faculty of Engineering Science > Chair Functional Materials
Faculties > Faculty of Engineering Science > Chair Functional Materials > Chair Functional Materials - Univ.-Prof. Dr.-Ing. Ralf Moos
Profile Fields > Advanced Fields > Advanced Materials
Research Institutions > Research Centres > Bayreuth Center for Material Science and Engineering - BayMAT
Profile Fields
Profile Fields > Advanced Fields
Research Institutions
Research Institutions > Research Centres
Language: English
Originates at UBT: Yes
URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:703-epub-5349-9
Date Deposited: 22 Mar 2021 11:45
Last Modified: 20 Apr 2021 05:36
URI: https://epub.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/5349

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