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Dark microbial CO2 fixation in temperate forest soils increases with CO2 concentration

DOI zum Zitieren der Version auf EPub Bayreuth: https://doi.org/10.15495/EPub_UBT_00004947
URN to cite this document: urn:nbn:de:bvb:703-epub-4947-7

Title data

Spohn, Marie ; Müller, Karolin ; Höschen, Carmen ; Mueller, Carsten W. ; Marhan, Sven:
Dark microbial CO2 fixation in temperate forest soils increases with CO2 concentration.
In: Global Change Biology. Vol. 26 (March 2020) Issue 3 . - pp. 1926-1935.
ISSN 1365-2486
DOI der Verlagsversion: https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.14937

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Project information

Project title:
Project's official titleProject's id
SP1389/6‐1, MU 3021/4‐2No information

Project financing: Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

Abstract

Dark, that is, nonphototrophic, microbial CO2 fixation occurs in a large range of soils. However, it is still not known whether dark microbial CO2 fixation substantially contributes to the C balance of soils and what factors control this process. Therefore, the objective of this study was to quantitate dark microbial CO2 fixation in temperate forest soils, to determine the relationship between the soil CO2 concentration and dark microbial CO2 fixation, and to estimate the relative contribution of different microbial groups to dark CO2 fixation. For this purpose, we conducted a 13C-CO2 labeling experiment. We found that the rates of dark microbial CO2 fixation were positively correlated with the CO2 concentration in all soils. Dark microbial CO2 fixation amounted to up to 320 µg C kg−1 soil day−1 in the Ah horizon. The fixation rates were 2.8–8.9 times higher in the Ah horizon than in the Bw1 horizon. Although the rates of dark microbial fixation were small compared to the respiration rate (1.2%–3.9% of the respiration rate), our findings suggest that organic matter formed by microorganisms from CO2 contributes to the soil organic matter pool, especially given that microbial detritus is more stable in soil than plant detritus. Phospholipid fatty acid analyses indicated that CO2 was mostly fixed by gram-positive bacteria, and not by fungi. In conclusion, our study shows that the dark microbial CO2 fixation rate in temperate forest soils increases in periods of high CO2 concentrations, that dark microbial CO2 fixation is mostly accomplished by gram-positive bacteria, and that dark microbial CO2 fixation contributes to the formation of soil organic matter.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Additional notes (visible to public): BAYCEER154461
Keywords: Anaplerotic reactions; Carbon cycle; Chemoautotrophic bacteria; CO2 concentration; Dark microbial CO2 fixation; Fungal–bacterial interactions; Microbial carbon pump; Microbial soil carbon processing; Soil organic matter formation
DDC Subjects: 500 Science
500 Science > 550 Earth sciences, geology
Institutions of the University: Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Chair Soil Ecology
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Chair Soil Ecology > Chair Soil Ecology - Univ.-Prof. Dr. Eva Lehndorff
Research Institutions
Research Institutions > Research Centres
Research Institutions > Research Centres > Bayreuth Center of Ecology and Environmental Research- BayCEER
Faculties
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences
Language: English
Originates at UBT: Yes
URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:703-epub-4947-7
Date Deposited: 21 Jul 2020 11:13
Last Modified: 21 Jul 2020 11:13
URI: https://epub.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/4947

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