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Central Asia's Changing Climate : How Temperature and Precipitation Have Changed across Time, Space, and Altitude

DOI zum Zitieren der Version auf EPub Bayreuth: https://doi.org/10.15495/EPub_UBT_00004701
URN to cite this document: urn:nbn:de:bvb:703-epub-4701-6

Title data

Haag, Isabell ; Jones, Philip D. ; Samimi, Cyrus:
Central Asia's Changing Climate : How Temperature and Precipitation Have Changed across Time, Space, and Altitude.
In: Climate. Vol. 7 (2019) Issue 10 . - No. 123.
ISSN 2225-1154
DOI der Verlagsversion: https://doi.org/10.3390/cli7100123

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Version: Published Version
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Project information

Project title:
Project's official titleProject's id
Ecological Calendars and Climate Adaptation in the Pamirs, ECCAPSA 775/12-1
Open Access PublizierenNo information

Project financing: Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

Abstract

Changes in climate can be favorable as well as detrimental for natural and anthropogenic systems. Temperatures in Central Asia have risen significantly within the last decades whereas mean precipitation remains almost unchanged. However, climatic trends can vary greatly between different subregions, across altitudinal levels, and within seasons. Investigating in the seasonally and spatially differentiated trend characteristics amplifies the knowledge of regional climate change and fosters the understanding of potential impacts on social, ecological, and natural systems. Considering the known limitations of available climate data in this region, this study combines both high-resolution and long-term records to achieve the best possible results. Temperature and precipitation data were analyzed using Climatic Research Unit (CRU) TS 4.01 and NASA’s Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) 3B43. To study long-term trends and low-frequency variations, we performed a linear trend analysis and compiled anomaly time series and regional grid-based trend maps. The results show a strong increase in temperature, almost uniform across the topographically complex study site, with particular maxima in winter and spring. Precipitation depicts minor positive trends, except for spring when precipitation is decreasing. Expected differences in the development of temperature and precipitation between mountain areas and plains could not be detected.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
DDC Subjects: 500 Science > 500 Natural sciences
500 Science > 550 Earth sciences, geology
900 History and geography
900 History and geography > 910 Geography, travel
Institutions of the University: Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Professor Climatology
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences > Professor Climatology > Professor Climatology - Univ.-Prof. Dr. Cyrus Samimi
Profile Fields > Advanced Fields > Ecology and the Environmental Sciences
Research Institutions > Research Centres > Bayreuth Center of Ecology and Environmental Research- BayCEER
Faculties
Profile Fields
Profile Fields > Advanced Fields
Research Institutions
Research Institutions > Research Centres
Language: English
Originates at UBT: Yes
URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:703-epub-4701-6
Date Deposited: 27 Mar 2020 10:00
Last Modified: 27 Mar 2020 10:01
URI: https://epub.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/4701

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