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Denying access to water? Moral values and commercialization policies in Khartoum governmental water management

URN to cite this document: urn:nbn:de:bvb:703-opus4-8998

Title data

Beckedorf, Anne-Sophie:
Denying access to water? Moral values and commercialization policies in Khartoum governmental water management.
Bayreuth , 2012 . - 12 S. S.

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Abstract

This contribution draws on empirical fieldwork carried out in Khartoum/Sudan in 2009/2010 in order to examine the role of value systems in recent commercialization policies of Khartoum governmental water management. The first section provides background information about the current water supply system in Khartoum, which is a necessary precondition to understand current reform processes. The second section singles out three major aspects of commercialization policies and their contestations in greater detail: increases in water prices, increases in water cuts in case of unpaid water bills, and installations of prepaid water meters. The third section summarizes these contestations and argues that value systems are one major reason why current reform processes are not implemented in the way they were perceived.

Further data

Item Type: Working paper, discussion paper
Keywords: Wasser; Khartoum; Sudan; commercialization; privatization; Water; Privatisierung; Kommerizialisierung
DDC Subjects: 500 Science
Institutions of the University: Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Earth Sciences
Faculties
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences
Language: English
Originates at UBT: Yes
URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:703-opus4-8998
Date Deposited: 25 Apr 2014 06:27
Last Modified: 04 Apr 2019 05:42
URI: https://epub.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/226

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