Titlebar

Export bibliographic data
Literature by the same author
plus on the publication server
plus at Google Scholar

 

Mate attraction, chemical defense, and competition avoidance in the parasitoid wasp Leptopilina pacifica

DOI zum Zitieren der Version auf EPub Bayreuth: https://doi.org/10.15495/EPub_UBT_00005332
URN to cite this document: urn:nbn:de:bvb:703-epub-5332-1

Title data

Böttinger, Lea C. ; Hüftlein, Frederic ; Stökl, Johannes:
Mate attraction, chemical defense, and competition avoidance in the parasitoid wasp Leptopilina pacifica.
In: Chemoecology. Vol. 31 (2021) Issue 2 . - pp. 101-114.
ISSN 1423-0445
DOI der Verlagsversion: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00049-020-00331-3

[img]
Format: PDF
Name: Böttinger2021_Article_MateAttractionChemicalDefenseA.pdf
Version: Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons BY 4.0: Attribution
Download (1MB)

Project information

Project financing: Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

Abstract

A major hypothesis for the evolution of chemical signals is that pheromones arise from non-communicative precursor compounds. However, data supporting this hypothesis are rare, primarily because the original functions of the antecedent compounds often have been lost. A notable exception, however, is the parasitoid wasp species Leptopilina heterotoma, whose compound (−)-iridomyrmecin is used as a defensive secretion, a cue for females to avoid competition with con- and hetero-specific females, and as the primary component of the females’ sex pheromone. To better understand the evolution of sex pheromones from defensive compounds, we examined the chemical ecology of L. pacifica, the sister species of L. heterotoma. Here, we show that L. pacifica also produces a defensive secretion containing a species-specific mixture of mostly iridoid compounds. However, the composition of the secretion is more complex than in L. heterotoma, and iridomyrmecin is only a minor component. Moreover, in contrast to L. heterotoma, conspecific female competitors were not avoided by female subjects, and a role of the iridoids in the female sex pheromone of L. pacifica can be excluded, as only the females’ cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) resulted in the elicitation of courtship by males. Although closely related, the two sister species show substantial differences in the use of the defensive secretion for communicative purposes. Variation in pheromone usage in this genus still presents a conundrum, highlighting the need for additional studies to understand the selective forces shaping the evolution of pheromone composition.

Further data

Item Type: Article in a journal
Keywords: Figitidae; Pheromone; Evolution; Iridomyrmecin; Citral; Cuticular hydrocarbons
DDC Subjects: 500 Science > 570 Life sciences, biology
Institutions of the University: Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology > Chair Animal Ecology II - Evolutionary Animal Ecology > Chair Animal Ecology II - Evolutionary Animal Ecology - Univ.-Prof. Dr. Sandra Steiger
Research Institutions > Research Centres > Bayreuth Center of Ecology and Environmental Research- BayCEER
Faculties
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology
Faculties > Faculty of Biology, Chemistry and Earth Sciences > Department of Biology > Chair Animal Ecology II - Evolutionary Animal Ecology
Research Institutions
Research Institutions > Research Centres
Language: English
Originates at UBT: Yes
URN: urn:nbn:de:bvb:703-epub-5332-1
Date Deposited: 17 Mar 2021 09:31
Last Modified: 17 Mar 2021 09:50
URI: https://epub.uni-bayreuth.de/id/eprint/5332

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year